BIBLE 2018 | Week 22

Galatians 1-3 | Sunday: You can listen to the NAC Galatians series here.

Exodus 33-36 | Monday: For a message on Moses’ prayer in these chapters to save the people, listen to this powerful message by David Platt.

I Kings 1-4 | Tuesday: David dies as a old man and Solomon takes his place as king.

Psalms 63-65 | Wednesday: Psalm 63 begins like this: “O God, you are my God; earnestly I seek you; my soul thirsts for you; my flesh faints for you, as in a dry and weary land where there is no water.”

John Piper tells us that David in this Psalm is thirsting after God and his thirsting: 

is not primarily a thirst for any of God’s gifts. It is a thirst for God. David has a heart for God. He has a taste for fellowship with God. 
He makes this even more explicit in verse 3: “Because your steadfast love is better than life, my lips will praise you. This means that David wanted God more than he wanted life. And if you want God more than you want life, then you want God more than you want all the joys of this life—family, health, food, friendship, sexual relations, job-satisfaction, productivity, books, skateboards, computers, music, homes, sunsets, fall colors.
When David says that the love of God is better than life and therefore better than all the beauty that life means, he is not denying that all these good things come from the love of God. He is warning us, rather, that if our hearts settle (even gratefully!) on the beauty of the gift and do not yearn for the infinitely greater beauty of the Giver, then we are idolaters and not worshipers of God.”

Proverbs 1 | Thursday: D.A. Carson gives us some insight into Proverbs 1 and wisdom in the Old Testament: 

Before embarking on Proverbs 1, I must say a little about “wisdom” in the Old Testament….

[W]isdom in the Old Testament, though its meaning sometimes overlaps with modern English use, has a flavor all its own. At one level, it is a broad concept that embraces the structure of everything in God’s universe, both substance and relationships, even before anything exists (cf. 8:22). The glory of God is manifested in such wisdom; it may even be manifested by his resolve to hide such wisdom (25:2). Yet at another level, wisdom in the Old Testament is simply a skill of one kind or another. (1) It may be the skill to survive, which is why ants and lizards are said to be extremely wise (30:24-28). (2) It is the skill to get along with people, what we call “social skills”—how to get along with friends, employers, rulers, spouse, and above all with God. Intuitively one glimpses how this practical “wisdom” or skill is related to the fundamental wisdom, i.e., to how things really are in God’s universe. This use of “wisdom” is strikingly common in Proverbs. (3) Wisdom may refer to some technical skill or other (e.g., Ex. 28:3).

In today’s categories, one might have the “wisdom” to run a lathe or program a computer or sew a fine garment. One of these practical skills, one that overlaps with the second entry, is administrative skill, administrative wisdom. This includes judicial insight. It involves not only the mechanics of administration, but being able to listen attentively and penetrate to the heart of a matter (e.g., Deut. 1:15). This, of course, was the “wisdom” for which Solomon prayed (1 Kings 3); it is the wisdom that characterizes the Messiah (Isa. 11:2). 

The proverbs of this book, then, are set out “for attaining wisdom and discipline; for understanding words of insight; for acquiring a disciplined and prudent life, doing what is right and just and fair” (1:2-3). The opposite of wisdom is therefore not only “folly” in some intellectual sense, but “folly” understood to be little short of sin. So the “son” of this chapter is exhorted to follow the instruction of Mum and Dad (1:8), or more generally, to pursue wisdom (1:20ff.); the alternative is to be enticed by sinners into some other path (1:10ff.).

Jeremiah 47-52 | Friday: Jeremiah is the longest book in the entire Bible. It is even longer than Psalms if you’re counting words not chapters. There is much death and destruction in this book. Jeremiah reaches his high point in chapters 31-33 as it discusses the New Covenant hope that God’s people have.

Luke 7-8 | Saturday: For an NAC conference message on Luke 7 see here.

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