BIBLE 2018 | Week 24

Ephesians 1-3 | Sunday: Ephesians neatly divides into two halve. The first half (chapter 1-3) contains virtually no commands; the second half (chapters 4-6) contains dozens. Why?

Paul refuses to tell you what to do until he has told you what Jesus has already done for you.

Who you are in Christ should be the basis on which you live our your Christian life.

Let the promises of and gospel truths of these chapters encourage you and perhaps create tears of grateful joy!

While The Bible Project has some flaws (especially its under-emphasis on God’s wrath), its outlines are still useful tools to look at with discernment. Here is the overview of Ephesians.

Leviticus 1-3 | Monday: The day you’ve been waiting for has finally come. We’re starting Leviticus! The question Leviticus is answering is this. How can the holy God seen on Mount Sinai in the midst of lightning and thunder possibly dwell amidst a sinful people like Israel (or like us)?

The answer is: blood sacrifice. All of this anticipates the true Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world once and for all.

Here is a helpful video overview of Leviticus.

I Kings 10-13 | Tuesday: What Adam and Eve did in Eden when they bit into the forbidden fruit and were kicked out of the garden is what Solomon does in this passage.

Solomon seemed to be the “seed of David” who would bring blessing to Israel and then the whole world. We see glimpses of this in the amount of prosperity during the beginning of his reign. He has so much gold that silver becomes cheap.

Psalms 69-71 | Wednesday: D.A. Carson comments on Psalm 71 with these words: 

“Most Christians have listened to testimonies that relate how some man or woman lived a life of fruitlessness and open degradation, or at least of quiet desperation, before becoming a Christian. Genuine faith in the Lord Christ brought about a personal revolution: old habits destroyed, new friends and commitments established, a new direction to give meaning and orientation. Where there was despair, there is now joy; where there was turmoil, there is now peace; where there was anxiety, there is now some measure of serenity. And some of us who were reared in Christian homes have secretly wondered if perhaps it might have been better if we had been converted out of some rotten background. 
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That is not the psalmist’s view. “For you have been my hope, O Sovereign LORD, my confidence since my youth. From birth I have relied on you; you brought me forth from my mother’s womb” (Ps. 71:5-6). “Since my youth, O God, you have taught me, and to this day I declare your marvelous deeds” (71:17). Indeed, because of this background, the psalmist calmly looks over the intervening years and petitions God for persevering grace into old age: “Do not cast me away when I am old; do not forsake me when my strength is gone” (71:9). “But as for me, I will always have hope; I will praise you more and more” (71:14). “Even when I am old and gray, do not forsake me, O God, till I declare your power to the next generation, your might to all who are to come” (71:18).” 
Carson ends by reminding all of us who grew up in Christian homes, that we should be thankful to God for our upbringing, even if we weren’t converted until later in life. He says: “It is best, by far, to be grateful for a godly heritage…” 

Proverbs 4 | Thursday: The NASB translation of Proverbs 4:23 says: “Watch over your heart with all diligence, For from it flow the springs of life.” Some translations say: “guard your heart.”

D.A. Carson tells us that this verse: 

means more than “be careful what, or whom, you love”—though it cannot easily mean less than that. It means something like, “Be careful what you treasure; be careful what you set your affections and thoughts on.” 

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For the “heart,” in this usage, “is the wellspring of life.” It directs the rest of life. What you set your mind and emotions on determines where you go and what you do. It may easily pollute all of life.

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The imagery is perhaps all the clearer in this section of Proverbs because the ensuing verses mention other organs: “Put away perversity from your mouth; keep corrupt talk far from your lips. Let your eyes look straight ahead. . . . Make level paths for your feet” (4:24-26). But above all, guard your heart, “for it is the wellspring of life.” It is the source of everything in a way that, say, the feet are not.

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Jesus picks up much the same imagery. “You brood of vipers,” he says to one group, “how can you who are evil say anything good? For out of the overflow of the heart the mouth speaks. The good man brings good things out of the good stored up in him, and the evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in him” (Matt. 12:34-35). So guard your heart. 

Make this duty of paramount importance:
Above all else, guard your heart.” One can see why. If the heart is nothing other than the center of your entire personality, that is what must be preserved. If your religion is merely external, while your “heart” is a seething mass of self-interest, what good is the religion? If your heart is ardently pursuing peripheral things,…then from a Christian perspective you soon come to be occupied with the merely peripheral.
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If what you dream of is possessing a certain thing, if what you pant for is a certain salary or reputation, that shapes your life. But if above all else you see it to be your duty to guard your heart, that resolve will translate itself into choices of what you read, how you pray, what you linger over. It will prompt self-examination and confession, repentance, and faith, and will transform the rest of your life.

Ezekiel 1-6 | Friday: Ezekiel is alive during the time of the great exile to Babylon. He himself is taken to the Chebar canal just outside of Babylon.

For a helpful overview, see here.

Luke 11-12 | Saturday: Luke 12:35-40 says: 

Stay dressed for action and keep your lamps burning, 36 and be like men who are waiting for their master to come home from the wedding feast, so that they may open the door to him at once when he comes and knocks. 37 Blessed are those servants whom the master finds awake when he comes. Truly, I say to you, he will dress himself for service and have them recline at table, and he will come and serve them. 38 If he comes in the second watch, or in the third, and finds them awake, blessed are those servants! 39 But know this, that if the master of the house had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have left his house to be broken into. 40 You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect.
R.C. Sproul comments on this portion of Luke and reminds us that: 
 
We don’t know the appointed day or hour of his return, but we know two things with certainty. One, that he is coming, and two, that his coming is closer today than it was yesterday. With each passing moment, human history moves closer to the return of Jesus. It may be another two thousand years before Jesus returns, although frankly I doubt it. But whether he comes in our lifetime or not, it does not change the fact that we have a sober obligation to be ready at whatever time he comes. That is the call of the New Testament, to be found awake and involved in fulfilling the duties that Christ has given to his people.

 

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